Welcome to Abintra Wellness Elevation Thermography (Infrared Imaging) Page

What Is Thermography?

Thermography uses a high-resolution infrared imaging system in a controlled environment to take images of clients who have followed specific pre-imaging protocols (listed at bottom of page).  Clinical infrared imaging is performed to determine if asymmetrical thermal patterns are present, which can tell thermologists if there may be a risk to the body.  The FDA approved thermography as an adjunct imaging procedure for breast cancer in 1982.  It is not a replacement for any other forms of imaging.  It does not screen, detect, or diagnose health disorders.  Infrared imaging reports are meant to identify thermal emissions that suggest potential risk markers and do not suggest a diagnosis or treatment.  Only a medical doctor can diagnose.  The thermal markers must be correlated by the patient's treating physician with additional testing and procedures before a final diagnosis can be made.  Some abnormalities will not have associated thermal markers so infrared imaging should not be used as a stand-alone test without clinical correlation. That said, infrared imaging has saved many lives by being a first alert for fast-growing forms of breast cancer.  It can also be a useful tool to help your physician, chiropractor, acupuncturist, or dentist identify inflammation caused by thyroid, dental, spinal, or auto-immune issues, to name a few.  A full list of conditions that have associated thermal markers are listed below.  No form of imaging is a hundred percent accurate.  Only a biopsy can determine for certain if cancer is present.  Thermography and mammograms are about 75 to 85 percent accurate.  They are completely different forms of imaging.  One uses thermal emissions from the body and is better for showing fast-growing forms of cancer; The other is better at detecting larger masses.  Thermography should not be used as a replacement for mammograms.  I recommend getting a breast thermogram six months before your annual mammogram to check for the fast-growing form of breast cancer, which can be insidious in less than a year.
Thermography does not send anything to your body.  It causes no side effects or toxicity.  It simply detects infrared heat naturally emitting from the surface of the body, which can be interpreted by thermologists.   There is no touching or probes involved.  It is completely non-invasive.


CTT Credential

I am a Certified Thermography Technician.  I download the infrared images of your body and the paperwork to Dr. William Amalu, the thermologist with whom I work.  He will interpret the images and download a report to me, which I upload to a USB flash drive, along with the images, for you to take to your doctor.


Pre-imaging Protocol 

Before you arrive for your thermogram, certain protocols must be followed in order to ensure that your images reflect accurate information.  Please read the following instructions and strictly adhere to them.
No prolonged sun exposure (sunbathing and tanning booth) to the body areas being imaged five days prior to the exam.
No use of deodorants, lotions, oils, creams, powders, or makeup (no facial makeup for full-body or upper body scans) the day of the exam.
No shaving or other hair removal of the areas to be imaged the day of the exam.  Shaving nicks and depilatory burns will cause inflammation that will affect the images.
No treatments (chiropractic, acupuncture, massage, TENS, physical therapy, electrical muscle stimulation, ultrasound, ice or cold pack use, heating pad, sauna, or steam room) or physical stimulation (scratching, rubbing, etc.) of the areas to be imaged for 24 hours before the exam.
No exercise the day of the exam.
If showering, it must be no closer than one hour before the exam.  No very hot baths for 24 hours prior to the exam.
Avoid pain medications for four hours prior to the examination.  However, you must consult with the prescribing physician for his or her consent prior to any change in medication.
You must wait at least four weeks after having a fine needle or core biopsy of the breast before a thermogram can be performed.
You must wait at least eight weeks after having a lumpectomy or surgical biopsy of the breast before a thermogram can be performed.
If you have had a medical procedure within the last 12 weeks, please tell me before scheduling your appointment.
If you are scheduled for a breast thermogram, the same protocols above apply along with no physical stimulation of the breasts for 24 hours before the exam.  If you are nursing, please try to nurse as far from one hour prior to the exam as possible.
Reschedule if you are sick or have a fever the day of the appointment.
Please note: During the examination you will be disrobed (from the waist up for breast exams, and buttocks exposed for lower body exams) during part of the examination for both imaging and to allow the the surface temperature of the body to equilibrate with the room.  You will be given a disposable thong for your privacy or you may wear your own.
You will fill out an intake form, a consent form, and a form to confirm you have followed the pre-imaging protocols when you arrive, which may take up to ten minutes.  Do not hesitate to call or text if you have any questions.  Thank you for choosing Abintra Wellness Elevation.  I look forward to meeting you.

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What Are Hormone Disruptors?

Hormone disruptors, such as xenoestrogens are chemicals that attach to the estrogen receptor sites.  The natural estrogen produced by the body has nowhere to go when its receptor sites are blocked.  If not used within twenty-four hours, estrogen breaks down and  becomes toxic and has to be removed by the lymph system along with the other toxins.  This problem can be exacerbated by a tight bra and stress hormones.  Cells can mutate in response to a chronically toxic environment and form benign fibroids, which can sometimes cause pain.  Further mutations of the cells can occur if the toxic environment is not improved.  This toxic condition is reversible as shown above.  A few hormone disruptors are included in the following list:

BPA/BPS/BPF 

Birth control pills

Breast implants

Chlorine

Heavy metal toxicity

Parabens

Pesticides

Phthalates

Plastic 

Propylene glycol

Sodium laurel sulfate

SLS derivatives

Synthetic clothing

Synthetic fragrance

Triclosan

Phytoestrogens, such as soy and flax, can be hormone disruptors if you are sensitive to them.

Be Proactive

Get a massage or bodywork regularly.

Move your body.

Go braless as often as possible.

Leave early and drive safely.

Eat certified organic food.

Drink filtered water.

Use glass or stainless steel containers.

Use face, body, and hair products without hormone disruptors.

Love your body the way it is naturally.

Wear natural fibers such as cotton, linen, and wool.

Sleep enough.

Eat enough.

Meditate.

Practice staying calm regardless of the circumstances.

Forgive yourself and others.

Focus on what brings you joy.

Focus on being healthy and everything working out for the best.

Listen to your intuition.

Follow your bliss.


This list is intended to suggest ways to prevent and reverse estrogen dominance and

improve general health.  It is not intended as a substitution for medical care.

Conditions With Associated Thermal Markers

Altered gait manifestations

Arteriosclerosis (peripheral)

Brachial plexus injury

Breast disease

Bursitis

Carotid artery stenosis

Carpal tunnel syndrome

Chronic pain

Compartment syndromes

Complex regional pain syndrome

Dental inflammation

Diabetes (secondary complications)

Disc syndromes 

Facet syndrome

Fibromyalgia

Headache evaluation (cervicogenic, migraine, sinus)

Herniated disc

Hypesthesia

Hyperaesthesia

Inflammation

Intervertebral disc disease

Ligament tears

Lumbosacral plexus injury

Muscular spasm

Muscle tears

Myofascial pain syndrome

Nerve entrapment or impingement

Nerve root irritation

Nerve stretch injury

Neuritis

Neuropathy

Neurovascular compression

Osteoathritis

Paresthesia

Peripheral nerve abnormaliities

Pinched nerves

Referred pain syndromes

Reflex sympathetic dystrophy

Repetitive strain injuries

Reynauds syndrome

Rheumatoid arthritis

Ruptured disc

Sacroiliac ligament tear

Sacroiliac syndrome

Sensory nerve abnormalities

Sinus inflammation

Skin conditions

Soft tissue injury

Spinal cord injury

Spinal discogenic pain

Sports injuries

Sprains/strains

Superficial vascular disease

Synovitis

Temporal arteritis 

Tendonitis

Thoracic outlet syndrome

Thyroid conditions

TMJ dysfunction (TMD)

Trigeminal neuralgia

Trigger points

Whiplash conditions

and many more...

Financial Assistance from UBCF

If you need financial assistance for a breast thermogram, contact the United Breast Cancer Foundation at UBCF.org.  Submit an application and you will receive an email from the UBCF within a week indicating the amount of assistance they will give to you.  Read the entire email and follow the instructions. 

Pre-imaging Protocol

Before you arrive for your thermogram, certain protocols must be followed in order to ensure that your images reflect accurate information.  Please read the following instructions and diligently adhere to them.


  • No prolonged sun exposure (sunbathing and sunburn) to the body areas to be imaged five days prior to the exam.
  • No use of deodorants, lotions, oils, creams, powders, or makeup (no facial makeup for full body or upper body scans) the day of the exam.
  • No shaving or other hair removal of the areas to be imaged the day of the exam.
  • No treatment (acupuncture, chiropractic, massage, TENS, physical therapy, electrical muscle stimulation, ultrasound, ice or cold pack, heating pad, sauna or steam room) or physical stimulation of the areas to be imaged for 24 hours before the exam.
  • No exercise the day of the exam.
  • If showering, it must be no closer than one hour before the exam.  No hot baths for 24 hours prior to the exam.
  • If you are using pain medications, please avoid taking them for four hours prior to the examination.  However, you must consult with the prescribing physician for his or her consent prior to any change in medication.
  • You must wait at least four weeks after having a fine needle or core biopsy of the breast before a thermogram can be performed.
  • You must wait at least eight weeks after having a lumpectomy or surgical biopsy of the breast before a thermogram can be performed.
  • If you have had any medical procedure within the last 12 weeks, please notify me before scheduling your appointment.
  • If you are scheduling a breast thermogram, the same protocols above apply along with no physical stimulation of the breast for 24 hours before the exam.  If you are breast-feeding, please try to nurse as far from one hour prior to the exam as possible.


Please note:  During the examination you will be disrobed (from the waist up for breast exams, and buttocks exposed for lower body exams) during part of the examination for both imaging and to allow for the surface temperature of the body to equilibrate with the room.  


Upon your arrival you will fill out an intake form, a consent form, and a form confirming you followed the pre-imaging protocols.


Do not hesitate to call or text any questions.  Thank you for choosing Abintra Wellness Elevation.  I look forward to meeting you.

CTT Credential

I am a certified thermography technician.  I download the infrared images of your body and the paperwork to Dr. William Amalu, the thermologist with whom I work.  He will interpret the images and download a report to me, which I upload to a USB stick, along with the images, for you to take to your doctor..

Disclaimer

Thermography is not intended to be used as a replacement for annual mammograms.   No imaging method is 100 percent accurate nor can any imaging method diagnose.  Only a biopsy can determine for sure if cancer is present.  Only a medical doctor can diagnose.  Since thermography and mammograms are completely different, one using thermal markers, the other measuring mass, they complement each other perfectly.  What one misses the other will hopefully catch.  I recommend getting a breast thermogram six months before a mammogram to detect fast-growing, insidious forms of breast cancer.  Do monthly self-exams even if you are getting thermograms and mammograms.

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